UCLA Global Portal

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The lens into global and international programs, activities and data at UCLA

Campus Programs

This page highlights programs, faculty, and courses at each UCLA school and division with global and international focus. Please scroll down or select from the list below to display the school or division information.

College of Letters and Science: Humanities

Website

  • Centers/Institutes
      • Center for 17th- and 18th-Century Studies

        The Center, which administers the William Andrews Clark Memorial Library in West Adams, supports research related to the seventeenth and long-eighteenth centuries as well as Oscar Wilde and the fin-de-siècle aesthetics movement. Through its robust program of fellowships, conferences, and institutes, the Center serves as a forum for students, professors, and independent scholars to collaborate and commune.

        Website

      • Center for Digital Humanities

        The UCLA Center for Digital Humanities (CDH) is a research, teaching and technology unit leading innovations that span the humanities, arts, social sciences, information studies, and computational sciences. CDH is a physical space for exploration and experimentation as well as a virtual space for networking and sharing.  It is composed of a community of scholars, students, and practitioners who come together to design, create, experiment, innovate, and disseminate new knowledge in the digital age.

        Website

      • Center for Jewish Studies

        The UCLA Alan D. Leve Center for Jewish Studies is dedicated to advancing scholarship in all areas of Jewish culture and history, educating the next generation about the role of Judaism in world civilization, and serving as an exceptional public resource for Jewish life and learning.

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      • Center for Liberal Arts and Free Institutions

        The Center for the Liberal Arts and Free Institutions is an interdisciplinary center created in 2009 as part of the UCLA division of Humanities.

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      • Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies

        The UCLA Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies (CMRS) supports interdisciplinary and cross-cultural studies of the period from Late Antiquity to the middle of the seventeenth century through a program of lectures, seminars, conferences, and fellowships for visiting professors, post-doctoral scholars, graduate students, and researchers. Additionally, we publish the academic journals Viator and Comitatus as well as a book series called Cursor Mundi.

        Website

      • Center for the Study of Religion

        The UCLA Center for the Study of Religion coordinates and promotes the academic study of religion at the University for members of the campus community as well as for a wider public. In addition to housing an undergraduate major, the Center sponsors seminars, lectures, and conferences as well as films and artistic performances that explore the role of religious ideas, practices and institutions within human societies, both historical and contemporary and throughout the regions of the world.

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      • Costen Institute of Archaeology [Near Eastern Languages and Cultures]

        The Cotsen Institute of Archaeology at UCLA is a premier research organization dedicated to the creation, dissemination, and conservation of archaeological knowledge and heritage. The Cotsen Institute is home to both the Interdepartmental Archaeology Program and the UCLA/Getty Program in Archaeological and Ethnographic Conservation. It provides a forum for innovative faculty research, graduate education, and public programs at UCLA in an effort to impact positively the academic, local and global communities. The Cotsen Institute is at the forefront of archaeological research, education, conservation and publication and is an active contributor to interdisciplinary research at UCLA.

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      • Early Modern Studies [Spanish & Portuguese]

        Through diverse disciplinary methods, UCLA scholarship on early modernity explores cultural, philosophical, and social changes in local enclaves, circumscribed regions (the Mediterranean, the Pacific and Atlantic basins, South Asia and the Indian Ocean, continental interiors) and expansive geographies.

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      • Early Modern Globalization: Iberian Empires/Colonies/Nations [Spanish & Portuguese]

        Sponsored by the UC Consortium for the Humanities, “Early Modern Globalization” is a Multi-Campus Research Group composed of historians, art historians and literary scholars from across the UC system. The purpose of the group is to explore the history of global modernity through the lens of Iberian expansion and its impact on local cultures.

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      • Undergraduate Research Center--Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences [Spanish & Portuguese]

        Their primary mission is to promote, develop, and celebrate undergraduate student research with the overall goal of enhancing undergraduate education and preparing students for careers in all areas. The Undergraduate Research Center for the Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences serves all students in humanities, arts, social science, and behavioral science disciplines. We invite you to explore our website or drop by our office (A334 Murphy Hall) to find out more about our programs and services. We look forward to meeting you!

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      • UCLA Latin American Institute [Spanish & Portuguese]

        "The LAI supports research by funding grants and foreign-language instruction, and disseminates recent scholarship through conferences, workshops, public programs, teacher training, and publications. The UCLA Latin American Institute is a vital regional, national, and international resource on Latin America. Since its founding in 1959, the LAI has equipped generations of leaders, professionals, and students with the information and skills required for understanding the vast and complex region of Latin America. The LAI supports research by funding grants and foreign-language instruction, and disseminates recent scholarship through conferences, workshops, public programs, teacher training, and publications."

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      • Undergraduate Student Writing Center [Writing Programs]

        "As part of UCLA Writing Programs, the Undergraduate Student Writing Center’s mission is to enrich the education of undergraduate students in all disciplines through individualized consultations on writing. Our goal is not only to help students with a particular writing assignment, but also to help them become more effective and confident writers. This means that we work on two levels at once: we help writers 1) to gain insight into how they write most productively and efficiently, and 2) to meet the intellectual and rhetorical demands of specific writing tasks or assignments."

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  • Programs/Degrees/Certificates/Specializations
      • Department of Art History

        "Building on a long tradition of intellectual innovation, the Department of Art History at UCLA endorses an interdisciplinary and intercultural approach to art history of all periods and places. By thinking across current categories and boundaries and critically interrogating art history itself, our students are encouraged to question the canon, to rethink the relationships between margins and centers, and to practice a socially and politically responsible art history. The art history department at UCLA offers programs leading to the Bachelor of Arts, Master of Arts, and Ph.D. degrees, with courses surveying Western and non-Western art from earliest human history to the present. Students learn to treat artistic works and trends from a critical and historical point of view, analytically rather than subjectively. This dynamic curriculum prepares students for careers in which a broad knowledge of art is important and provides students interested in graduate study with a foundation for research requiring independent critical judgment. The rich and varied art resources available at UCLA and throughout Southern California offer students extraordinary opportunities to supplement the formal curriculum."

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      • Art History Undergraduate Program

        Art History provides a humanistic and intellectual foundation for the historian through courses in history and theory. The undergraduate curriculum attempts to help students understand the visual arts in their contexts. Emphasis is placed on the social, political, historical and religious contexts of art; visual analysis is also stressed. The department offers a wide variety of courses beginning with a general four-course survey and continuing on through all periods of Western and non-Western art. Class size varies from 400 students in survey classes to about 15 in some upper division courses with occasionally fewer students in Advanced Studies Seminars. Art History majors are required to take courses in a variety of areas, both Western and non-Western.

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      • Art History Graduate Program [M.A. and Ph.D., joint]

        Fields of study in the Ph.D. program include American, contemporary Europe & America (post 1945), Greek and Roman, Latin American, Medieval & Byzantine, modern Europe & America (19th and 20th century), Renaissance & Baroque, African, Chinese, Islamic, Japanese, Korean, pre-Columbian, and South & Southeast Asian.

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      • Department of Asian Languages & Cultures

        Asian Languages and Cultures (ALC) is dedicated to teaching about all aspects of Asia — films, history, folklore, literatures, linguistics, religions (Buddhism, Confucianism, Daoism, Shinto, etc.), philosophy — from antiquity to today. While most of our courses are offered in English, we also teach a wide variety of important languages, such as Chinese, Filipino, Hindi-Urdu, Indonesian, Japanese, Korean, Sanskrit, Thai, Vietnamese and others. We aim to nurture the leaders of tomorrow by helping them develop critical thinking and writing skills through in-depth study of Asian cultures within historical, linguistic, and comparative contexts. Knowledge of Asian cultures and languages prepares students for success in the 21st Century, especially if they pursue careers in business, government, international relations, journalism, law, media, medicine, publishing, science, teaching, and writing. ALC is one of the leading departments of its kind. Here you will find professors who lead the nation in innovative research and new approaches to teaching. You will find language instructors who inspire mastery of speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills. You will find a dedicated staff to help students navigate the many resources we offer.

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      • Asian Languages & Cultures Undergraduate Program

        Undergraduate majors include Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Asian Humanities, and Asian Religions. Minors include Asian Languages and Asian Humanities.

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      • Asian Languages & Cultures Graduate Program [M.A. and Ph.D., joint]

        Our department is home to both established, well-known faculty members and exciting younger scholars, and we count among our faculty a past president of the Association of Asian Studies, a winner of the Levenson Book Prize, a Korea Foundation Award winner, and a MacArthur Fellow, among others. Our graduate students have created a challenging, yet supportive and collegial, intellectual community, one that rivals the best worldwide. Our department is proud of our graduate students’ achievements, and we have a stellar record of tenure-track job placements, postdoctoral positions, and major fellowships. (Christopher P. Hanscom, Assoc. Prof & Director of Graduate Studies)

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      • Department of Classics

        "The UCLA Department of Classics is one of three Humanities departments at UCLA ranked in the top ten nationally in the last National Research Council report. Classics forms the foundation for the Humanities. Philology, philosophy, government (including democracy), the theater, linguistics, archaeology, literary theory and many other fields have their origins in the Classics. The UCLA Department of Classics has a robust undergraduate and graduate program. Each year we teach an average of 2,500 undergraduate students various aspects of Greek and Roman culture, literature, philology, archaeology, and history. We have a dedicated and diverse faculty of scholars and teachers, many at mid-career, whose areas of expertise represent a variety of disciplines at the heart of classical antiquity. Areas of faculty strength have long been in Classical philology and subfields of paleography, Classical linguistics, Byzantine studies, and medieval Latin, now supplemented with new fields of excellence in Greek and Mediterranean archaeology, Indo-European linguistics, ancient and medieval philosophy, particularly Greek philosophy, ancient Greek political thought, ancient sexuality and gender studies, and Neo-Latin and Renaissance studies. We have the highest number and proportion of women faculty in any Classics department of our size at a major research university."

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      • Classics Undergraduate Program

        The Department of Classics is committed to the study of ancient Greece and Rome and their political, social, artistic, and intellectual legacy. The area of inquiry spans more than two thousand years, from the art and archaeology of the Mediterranean Bronze Age (ca. 1700 B.C.E.) to the breakdown of the Roman empire in Late Antiquity (ca. 400 C.E.). The interdisciplinary nature of the program offers its students a broad range of courses in the fields of language, literature, religion, mythology, philosophy, political history, cultural studies, digital humanities, virtual reality, archaeology, art, and film.

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      • Classics Graduate Program [M.A./Ph.D.]

        UCLA Classics allows students to pursue a varied set of interests with a world-class faculty known for teaching, mentoring and scholarship. Besides our strengths in Greek and Latin language, literature and culture, our program also benefits from and contributes to the university's strengths in Archaeology (the Cotsen Institute), Indo-European Studies, Near Eastern Languages and Cultures (including Egyptology), Philosophy, Women's Studies, and LGBT Studies. We emphasize control of language, literature and theory, integrating them with the understanding of material culture; mastery of teaching skills in a range of courses; and job placement.

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      • Post-Baccalaureate Program in Classics

        "The Department of Classics in collaboration with UCLA Extension (UNEX) administers the Post-Baccalaureate Certificate Program, with an emphasis in Classics (Greek and Latin) or Latin. The Post-Baccalaureate Program in Classics offers students who have completed a bachelor’s degree or its equivalent the opportunity to continue their studies in Greek and/or Latin for one or two additional years prior to admission to graduate programs in Classics and related fields. The Program is supervised by the faculty of UCLA’s internationally recognized Department of Classics. Students in the Program are an integral part of the Department’s overall teaching mission and enroll in regular undergraduate (and, with permission, graduate) courses. In addition to satisfying program requirements, students are expected to take full advantage of the Department’s busy program of lectures, conferences, and other activities."

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      • Mellon Program in Post-Classical Latin

        The UCLA Department of Classics is delighted to announce the award of a $700,000 grant by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to the Division of the Humanities to support the preparation and training of young scholars in post-classical Latin for graduate programs in Medieval and Renaissance Studies. Originally conceived and proposed by our former colleague, Professor Shane Butler (University of Bristol, Chair of Latin Language and Literature), the program has been funded for three years and will have a post-baccalaureate and graduate fellowship component.

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      • Post-Baccalaureate Program in Post-Classical Latin [under Mellon Program]

        The post-baccalaureate program in post-classical Latin is intended for students who have completed B.A. degrees and who seek to pursue Ph.D. programs requiring study and proficiency in late Latin texts and documents. A cohort of up to four students will be chosen each year by a faculty subcommittee. All university fees and a stipend of $18,000 will be provided to allow the admitted students to spend a year at UCLA participating in the post-classical Latin curriculum as well as taking existing courses in Classical Latin and, more broadly, in undergraduate and graduate courses in Medieval and Renaissance Studies. Participating departments include English, History, Art History, Italian, Philosophy, French and Francophone Studies, and Near Eastern Languages and Cultures. The program offers a pro-seminar in the Fall Quarter to introduce students to UCLA faculty and to prepare them for successful applications to top-ranked Ph.D. programs.

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      • Department of Comparative Literature

        "Standing at the forefront of innovative work in literary, theoretical, and cultural studies, UCLA’s Comparative Literature program is one of the most exciting fields in the humanities. As a discipline it requires exceptional linguistic ability, theoretical knowledge, and high intellectual caliber. UCLA’s program offers students the opportunity to work with faculty members in any of the University’s language and literature departments as well as with a diverse Comparative Literature Department faculty. Both interdisciplinary and multilingual, the Comparative Literature Department is committed to continuing its pioneering work in defining literary paradigms and fostering new directions for exploration in literary studies."

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      • Comparative Literature Undergraduate Program

        UCLA’s Department of Comparative Literature offers both inspiring coursework and the chance to build an exciting, yet practical B.A. or minor. Students’ studies evolve beyond a single language or tradition. Working towards that goal, the faculty of Comparative Literature offer a flexible, multicultural, and interdisciplinary general education; this means students can take courses in numerous departments. In the same way, the CL major is designed for undergraduates who wish to investigate both literature and language (from at least two different national traditions) within cultural, socioeconomic, historical, or political contexts. Students acquire the skills to approach the arts and global culture from a range of perspectives: psychological, philosophical, economic, and technological.

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      • Comparative Literature Graduate Program [M.A. and Ph.D., joint]

        "Standing at the forefront of innovative work in literary, theoretical, and cultural studies, comparative literature is one of the most exciting fields in the humanities. As a discipline it requires exceptional linguistic ability, theoretical knowledge, and high intellectual caliber. UCLA’s program offers students the opportunity to work with faculty members in any of the University’s language and literature departments as well as with the Department of Comparative Literature faculty. UCLA’S Comparative Literature department, which is interdisciplinary and multilingual in scope, is committed to continuing its pioneering work in defining new literary paradigms and fostering new directions for exploration in literary studies, including such areas as: - The relationship between translation and transnationalism - Literary theory and emerging media - The future of national literatures in an era of globalization, gender and sexuality studies - East-West cultural encounters - Human rights and global censorship - Postcolonial and diaspora studies - Experimental approaches to literature and culture"

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      • Experimental Critical Theory Program [Comparative Literature]

        The UCLA Program in Experimental Critical Theory is meant to galvanize, coordinate, and expand research and teaching in critical theory across departments and disciplines at UCLA. The Program offers the Graduate Certificate in Experimental Critical Theory, which is open to graduate students enrolled in a Ph.D. or MFA program in any participating department at UCLA. The Program also sponsors the annual ECT Colloquium, which meets twice a quarter, and various lectures and conferences.

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      • Department of English

        Widely recognized as one of the leading departments in the nation, English at UCLA long has been known for its innovative research and excellence in teaching. Today, the English Department maintains its strong commitment to traditional areas of study, while also supporting groundbreaking research and teaching in new and interdisciplinary approaches to literary studies. Each year, our stellar faculty of nationally and internationally renowned scholars offer a rich array of undergraduate and graduate courses which reflect the great breadth of literatures in English. Our undergraduate program offers students a historically informed and geographically diverse perspective on literature, while also developing writing and analytic skills. Students in our graduate program have the opportunity to engage a wide variety of critical and scholarly approaches to English literatures and cultures.

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      • English Undergraduate Program

        The UCLA English Department is dedicated to providing its students with a liberal arts education, one that develops the reading, writing, and critical thinking skills necessary for them to excel in today's world. To do so, the department offers a wide range of courses on British, American, and Anglophone literatures and cultures. With over seventy faculty and a thousand declared majors, the department is a vibrant place for intellectual exchange, learning, and inquiry. Within the major, qualified students may elect a concentration in creative writing. The department also offers a Bachelor of Arts degree in American Literature and Culture and an English Minor.

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      • Capstone Program for the Department of English

        "In fall 2012, the English Department joined the UCLA-wide capstone program. This means that the department now offers four capstone formats for interested undergraduates majoring in English or American Literature and Culture (ALC): - Senior Honors Thesis administered by Departmental Honors Program (Critical Essay or Creative Writing project). - Directed Individual Research or Senior Project (199) - Participation in Undergraduate Student Initiated Education (USIE) (English 188SA-188SB) - Capstone Seminar (with Paper or Project)"

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      • English Graduate Program [M.A. and Ph.D., joint]

        The graduate program of the UCLA English Department is one of the strongest, most diverse, and most intellectually exciting in the country. Consistently highly ranked across fields, it receives over 300 applications of admission each year and enrolls an entering class of 10-12 students, all of whom receive full funding. The course of study toward the Ph.D. balances critical rigor and historical breadth with flexibility and individual focus. Seminars include both the traditional values of the discipline and the exciting innovations that are reshaping its future. We offer courses that incorporate the literary canon, investigate various modes of inquiry, and teach a range of critical methodologies.

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      • Creative Writing [English]

        "Although there is no formal program in creative writing on the graduate level, there are a number of ways that graduate student poets and fiction writers can explore and develop their interests. We have one graduate course, Workshop in Creative Writing (English 230). It is led by the Department’s own poets and fiction writers and distinguished visitors. Visitors have included Robert Coover, Alice Fulton, Louise Glück, Tina Howe, Robert Pinsky, John Barth, J. D. McClatchy, and Cherrie Moraga. For thirty years the series now called The Hammer Readings has presented acclaimed poets to UCLA audiences, providing the opportunity for students to listen to and meet poets in an intimate and relaxed setting. The readings occur about three times each quarter. In the past, they have featured such luminaries as Stephen Spender, Czeslow Milosz, Seamus Heaney, Anthony Hecht, Joseph Brodsky, Alice Fulton, John Ashbery, James Merrill, Mona Van Duyn, Eavan Boland, Galway Kinnell, and many others."

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      • Renaissance and Early Modern Studies [English]

        The Department of English at UCLA offers a doctoral program in Renaissance and Early Modern Studies, with an unsurpassed range of faculty and research resources.

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      • Postcolonial Theory & Literary Studies [English]

        "Postcolonial theory has transformed literary studies in the past three decades. By foregrounding how colonialism has radically altered the globe, this critical lens has provided flexible methodologies for engaging the literary production of empire, colonial and anti-colonial discourse, and the literature of current and former colonies in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, the Americas, and Pacific Islands. By turning to topics such as decolonization, migration, language, knowledge production, and representation, postcolonial studies approaches the study of literature in ways that intersect with other fields such as critical race theory and diaspora, feminist, indigenous, transnational, and transoceanic studies. Currently, UCLA has over twenty full-time faculty working in the field of postcolonial theory and literary studies in the Departments of Asian American Studies, Comparative Literature, English, French and Francophone Studies, and Spanish and Portuguese. This is one of the largest concentrations of postcolonial scholars at any university in the United States and perhaps beyond. This website provides research profiles of each faculty member, a link to the quarterly schedule for our Postcolonial Theory & Literary Studies, and information on how to join our Postcolonial Studies Email list. We are currently developing a Postcolonial Certificate for UCLA graduate students and will post more information on that in the future."

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      • Department of French and Francophone Studies

        The Department of French and Francophone Studies at UCLA is a major center for the study of the French language and of literatures, cultures, and civilizations of French expression throughout the world. French has for centuries been a major language of international culture, and the French literary and artistic tradition is great historical significance. In recent decades, French critical thought has occupied a highly influential position in the theoretical discourse of the humanities and social sciences. The instructional programs of the Department offer students the opportunity to achieve a well-rounded education and to pursue advanced research in a challenging intellectual environment with superior research facilities.

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      • French and Francophone Studies Undergraduate Program

        "Each quarter, about 400 students take undergraduate French language and literature courses at UCLA. French is a practical language that will expand your world and your job prospects. Learning French will prepare you for careers in education, international law and business, the arts, international health organizations, anthropology, diplomacy, and more. French is spoken not just in France, Canada, Belgium and Switzerland, but also in Guadeloupe, Martinique, Mauritius, Cameroon, Reunion, Senegal, Mali and in parts of India and Vietnam. In fact, it is the second most widely used language, after English, at the United Nations and is spoken on every continent. The Department encourages students in the Humanities – but also in the Social Sciences and Sciences – to apply for a Double Major. In addition to benefitting from a five-course overlap between the two Majors (when feasible), students may fulfill a portion of their French requirement with courses taken through the UCLA Travel Study program in Paris, and with courses taken at French and Francophone universities via the Education Abroad Program (or other approved programs), in cities like Paris, Bordeaux or Lyon. Double majors in the hard sciences and the humanities are sought after by many of today's employers for their wide-ranging knowledge and dynamic skillset."

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      • Undergraduate French Language Program

        The French Department's language program incorporates the latest proven techniques for developing communications skills. The high performance of our students owes much to the fact that teaching is conducted entirely in French. Videos and computers enrich classroom instruction. The first-year program provides a solid foundation in French and prepares students to actively use the language on a basic level. The second-year program introduces culture, literature and film while continuing to refine language skills.

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      • French and Francophone Studies Graduate Program [M.A. and Ph.D., joint]

        The Department of French and Francophone Studies offers a Ph.D. program that emphasizes original scholarly research in a selected field, combined with a solid general knowledge of French and Francophone literature and culture. The department's requirements are flexible and are suited to highly motivated students who want to chart their own path of intellectual development, while acquiring a solid grounding in their specialization through work with a broad range of faculty in our department as well as in other related departments or programs such as African Studies, Women's Studies, Diaspora Studies, Comparative Literature, History, Linguistics, Philosophy, and Art History.

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      • Department of Germanic Languages

        "The UCLA Department of Germanic Languages is committed to scholarship and teaching in three broad areas. First, language and linguistics. Recognizing that Germanic languages are many, we offer instruction not only in German but also in Dutch, Afrikaans, and Yiddish as well as older Germanic languages: Gothic, Old Saxon, Old and Middle High German. Convinced that language is fundamental to all we do, we regard the study of language per se—that is, historical and theoretical linguistics—as an important part of our common project. Second, literature and culture in the Germanic languages. Historical and critical literary studies have always played a central role in departments like ours. Literature in German, from the Middle Ages to the present, gets the most attention, but that in other Germanic languages is not neglected. Nor do we neglect the German philosophical tradition—figures like Kant, Hegel, Marx, and Freud being central to German and, more broadly, modern European culture. Third, interdisciplinary humanistic study. We are determined to pursue the study of Germanic languages and literatures not in isolation but in conversation with the broader, interdisciplinary study of western culture, past and present, that has flourished in the humanities over the last several decades. At the moment our principal interdisciplinary investments are to philosophy and critical theory, linguistics, media studies, gender and sexuality studies, and Jewish studies. Many of these fields not only overlap with one another in intellectually exciting ways but are central to the innovative research being done in the field as a whole. While we understand that students, like faculty, will have particular areas of interest, we consider it important to insure that all students who receive degrees from this department have, in addition to a solid grounding in their principal Germanic language, some knowledge of each of the three areas outlined above that constitute our discipline."

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      • Germanic Languages Undergraduate Program

        "The German major is designed for students who seek a solid grounding in the German language, an introduction to the study of linguistics, literature, and cultural studies, and the opportunity to determine their own area of focus. [Also, there are two minors.]"

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      • Germanic Languages Master's Degree

        There are three M.A. plans that differ with respect to course requirements and comprehensive examinations. Plan A is for students who plan to terminate their studies with the M.A. degree and an instructional credential. Plan B is for students whose main interests are in literature, culture, or German studies and who plan to proceed toward the Ph.D. degree. Plan C is for students whose main interests are in German linguistics and who plan to proceed toward the Ph.D. degree.

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      • Germanic Languages Doctoral Degree

        "Students must establish a three-member faculty guidance committee, in consultation with their adviser, no later than one year after completing the M.A. examination (or within one year of admission with an M.A. degree). Students who fail to do so within this time limit are not be eligible for teaching assistantships or fellowships. The composition of the guidance committee must be filed in writing with the Director of Graduate Studies. Students may ask one member from outside the department to serve on the committee if there is a programmatic need. Any changes in this committee must be approved by the graduate adviser and the faculty concerned, and filed with the Director of Graduate Studies. The director of this committee in most cases is the faculty member with whom the student would like to write her/his dissertation. The director must in all cases be a member of the department."

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      • Certificates in related programs towards Ph.D. in Germanic Languages

        "While pursuing the Ph.D. in German it is possible to work towards a graduate certificate in a related field.  Such a certificate indicates that you have taken a certain number of courses and acquired a more than casual competence in that other field.  Certificates are offered in: - Program in Experimental Critical Theory - Program in Indo-European Studies - Department of Gender Studies"

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      • The German Language Program [Germanic Languages]

        "We offer 3 years of German language study: 1st year elementary German (1-3); 2nd year intermediate German (4-6); and 3rd year advanced German conversation and composition (152, 153, 155, 157) as well as Business German (154). 1st year elementary German is also offered as an intensive course during each summer. Language courses at all levels are offered in our German Summer Travel Study Program. Two linguistics courses (140, 141) complete our advanced study of German by focusing on improving language skills while also introducting modern linguistic theory. We offer a wide range of courses in German linguistics, literature, culture, philosophy, film, and current affairs in German and in English."

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      • Dutch Studies at UCLA [Germanic Languages]

        DUTCH STUDIES AT UCLA is the largest program in the U.S that lays emphasis on both history and literature. Focused on the Netherlands and its global context, we teach courses on Dutch and Indonesian history, art, literature, and language and literature. We even branch out into Belgian history and Afrikaans.

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      • Program in Indo-European Studies [Ph.D.]

        "PIES is the UCLA Interdepartmental Graduate Program in Indo-European Studies, leading to the degree of Ph.D. At present, the program focuses on Indo-European linguistics, and on specialized language study in individual languages and language areas; nevertheless, the program also aims to provide an integrated understanding of Indo-European culture, based on comparative linguistics, archaeology, social structure, religion, mythology, and poetics. The program sponsors a lively series of visiting lectures, culminating in an international conference held on campus each fall, and partly organized by students in the program. The program maintains its own reading room, with reference materials and journal subscriptions covering all areas of Indo-European studies."

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      • Indo-European Studies Graduate Certificate

        The graduate certificate in Indo-European Studies requires a minimum of 6 quarter courses.

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      • Department of Italian

        The Department of Italian at UCLA offers a unique combination of literary, linguistic and cultural experience at both the undergraduate and graduate level, making it one of the most prestigious programs for Italian Studies in North America. Besides covering the full range of Italian language and literature, the Department also provides scholars the possibility of approaching Italian culture through film; through linguistic history and dialectology; through interdisciplinary ties to many other UCLA departments; and through close relationships with the UCLA Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, the Center for Jewish Studies, and the Italian Cultural Institute of Los Angeles.

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      • Italian Undergraduate Program

        Studying the Italian language and the history of Italian culture at UCLA provides invaluable insight into the origins and development of the Western European tradition and its continuing legacy and influence in today's globalized world. The UCLA department of Italian is one of the most academically renowned Italian studies programs in the English-speaking world, and offers the opportunity to work closely with faculty and peers in an informal atmosphere within a closely-knit community fostering communication, dialogue and an enjoyable learning environment. Our Italian program provides courses, activities (such as the Italian Club and the Dante Club) and opportunities (including internships and studying in Italy for a summer, quarter or entire academic year) that allow students to gain in-depth knowledge of the language and culture of Italy while also acquiring solid training in the humanities, critical thought, analytical work and communication skills.

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      • Italian M.A. Program

        The M.A. degree in Italian is available in one of the three areas of specialization, which the student should select upon application: Italian Literature, Italian Language, and Italian Cultural Studies. Course requirements differ according to the chosen specialization. Each M.A. degree may be pursued along either the Comprehensive Exam Plan or the Thesis Plan, though the latter is exceptional.

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      • Italian Ph.D. Program

        Applicants who possess an Italian M.A. degree from an American university deemed by this Department to be a peer institution will be credited with their M.A. and will be eligible to enter the Ph.D. program directly. Students with an M.A. degree from an institution in Italy which this department deems to be a peer institution can be admitted directly to the Ph.D. program, but will be required to pass the M.A. Comprehensive Examination no later than the end of their third quarter of graduate study. Students entering the graduate program with a B.A., or with a university degree in a discipline other than Italian literature, will be required to pursue the entire course of the M.A. program, and in some cases additional courses if deemed necessary by the faculty, before passing the Comprehensive Examination. As with all M.A. students, performance on the comprehensive exam will dictate whether they will be allowed to proceed to the Ph.D. program.

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      • Italian Summer Sessions

        "Without going abroad, students can study Italian language, literature and film every summer in Los Angeles via the UCLA Summer Sessions. Intensive Italian (equivalent to first year of college Italian) is particularly popular on the UCLA campus. For a sample syllabus and any other information concerning the 2015 summer curriculum at UCLA, please contact Prof. Thomas Harrison, Chair of Italian harrison@humnet.ucla.edu."

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      • Law & Philosophy Program

        "UCLA’s Law and Philosophy Program is a rich collaboration between UCLA Law and the University’s internationally renowned philosophy department. UCLA Law offers a broad range of resources for law and philosophy students, including a rich curriculum that explores the nature of law and legal systems and the theoretical underpinnings of particular doctrinal areas such as constitutional, criminal and contract law. Our Law and Philosophy Reading Room Collection provides an extensive selection of academic works and a quiet space for reading and philosophical conversation. The Program also sponsors events throughout the year. Our Legal Theory Workshop, a yearly graduate and law student conference, and the bi-annual Herbert Morris Lecture in Law and Philosophy bring prominent speakers to campus from across the academic world."

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      • Interdisciplinary Specialization in Law and Philosophy

        UCLA School of Law has a unique interdisciplinary specialization in law and philosophy. The specialization is designed for UCLA School of Law students who want to supplement their legal studies by exploring the philosophical foundations of law. The specialization is especially relevant to students interested in further graduate studies or exploring a career in academia. The specialization will expose students to material on the nature of law and legal systems, and on the theoretical underpinnings and justifications of particular doctrinal areas such as constitutional law, criminal law, and contract.

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      • Joint J.D./Ph.D. Program in Law and Philosophy

        The UCLA School of Law and the UCLA Department of Philosophy offer a joint JD/PhD program for exceptionally talented and especially committed students who hope to dedicate their careers to research and teaching in law and philosophy. Admission is extremely competitive, and very few students are admitted. It would be highly unusual for more than one candidate to be admitted in a year, and it is possible for no candidates to be admitted in an admission cycle.

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      • LGBT Studies Program

        The Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies Program at UCLA is an interdisciplinary program that supports teaching and research on the historical and contemporary experience of lesbians, gay men, bisexuals, and transgendered people. It provides an academic home for those who wish to study the intellectual and cultural traditions that have shaped our current understanding of sexuality and gender, as well as for those who wish to challenge such traditions and generate new theoretical paradigms. The program sponsors courses, offers an undergraduate minor, organizes lecture series, facilitates the study of minority sexualities and genders in the broadest interdisciplinary context, and tries to bring together interested students, faculty, and members of the larger Los Angeles community.

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      • Minor in LGBT Studies

        The minor in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies offers undergraduates the opportunity to study sexuality and gender from a variety of interdisciplinary perspectives. To complete the minor, students are expected to take seven courses, including an introduction to the field, a service learning course on community organizations, and five electives. The minor aims to acquaint students with some of the many different ways sexuality and gender have been organized in the past and the present and with a variety of approaches to studying sexuality and gender at the beginning of the twenty-first century.

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      • Department of Linguistics

        The UCLA Linguistics Department focuses on the scientific study of language in all aspects. The fields represented include phonetics, phonology, syntax, and semantics, as well as the interdisciplinary areas of psycholinguistics, language acquisition, historical linguistics, and mathematical linguistics. The department has a strong emphasis on linguistic theory as well as on fieldwork and experimental study. Three laboratories are housed in the department: the Phonetics Laboratory, the Language Processing Laboratory, and the Language Acquisition Laboratory.

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      • The Linguistics Undergraduate Program

        UCLA boasts one of the largest departments--and perhaps the largest undergraduate program--in linguistics in the United States. The Department has 18 full-time faculty members, a large phonetics laboratory containing equipment dedicated specifically to undergraduate students, and computer facilities for undergraduate students whose focus is computational linguistics.

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      • The Linguistics Graduate Programs [M.A. and Ph.D.]

        The department has a strong theoretical orientation committed to research in formal linguistic theory, addressing questions in the fields of phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics, and at the interfaces of these fields with the fields of psycholinguistics and neurolinguistics, computational linguistics, mathematical linguistics, historical linguistics, and the linguistic study of particular language areas (especially African languages and American Indian languages). A number of factors distinguish the UCLA linguistics department from other departments with similar emphases.

        Website

      • Department of Musicology

        "UCLA has a long and illustrious history of transformative musical scholarship going back to the decades after the establishment of the Westwood campus in the 1930s. The building in which Musicology is housed takes its name from an early professor of music, the composer Arnold Schoenberg, who taught at UCLA from 1936 until his retirement in 1944. The study of music at UCLA also bears the mark of pioneering ethnomusicologist Charles Seeger, who taught at UCLA from 1957 to 1971. The UCLA Department of Musicology was formed in the 1980s as a freestanding program within the UCLA Division of Humanities. The Department has a long-standing tradition of specialists in early repertories, including Emeriti Professors Marie Louise Göllner and Frank D'Accone, specialists in Medieval and Renaissance musics. Robert Stevenson (Emeritus) maintains his status as perhaps the leading authority on Spanish and Latin American musics; his pioneering archival and institutional work has laid the foundation for study of Iberian-American music around the globe. Beginning in the 1960s, the department acquired a number of scholars of seventeenth-, eighteenth-, and nineteenth-century music, including Murray Bradshaw (Emeritus), Malcolm Cole (Emeritus), and Richard Hudson (Emeritus)."

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      • Musicology Undergraduate Program

        "At the undergraduate level, the department offers several highly successful General Education courses (History of Rock and Roll, The Beatles, Film Music, American Popular Song, History of Opera, The Symphony, Bach, Mozart, Beethoven, History of Jazz, American Musicals, Electronic Dance Music, Music & Gender, and Gay & Lesbian Popular Music). It also provides the required History of Music sequence for majors in the Music Department, as well as undergraduate seminars on a variety of topics. Recent topics have included: Motown; Bach cantatas; Television music;  Blues and Individual Expression; Mozart operas; Feminist Criticism; Music, Media and Consumer society; Nationalism; Mahler; and Stravinsky. The undergraduate major in Music History was established soon after the Department became part of the College, and it now has about 48 students. This major is designed to provide training in the study of music for liberal arts students who do not wish to pursue a degree in performance. In 1994, the Department instituted a Music History minor, which currently has about 45 students. Given the new areas of popular music studies, film scores, and music criticism offered by the current musicology faculty, the undergraduate major is being tailored to satisfy the needs of students who wish to study music in popular culture, as well as those concerned with classical music."

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      • Musicology Graduate Program [M.A. and Ph.D.]

        UCLA's Department of Musicology is one of the most successful graduate programs in American musicology. Recent alumni of the department teach at the University of Michigan, UT Austin, UC Irvine, Michigan State, Dalhousie University, Bates College, and other schools across the nation and the world. Our intellectual community is strikingly diverse, with U.S. graduate students from all regions of the country, international students from Canada, Mexico, Holland, Bermuda, Guatemala and Korea, and visiting scholars from as far away as China and the Ukraine. UCLA graduate students are highly professional, running both a respected online journal, ECHO , and the department's Distinguished Lecture Series.

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      • Department of Near Easten Languages and Cultures (NELC)

        We believe our department is one of the finest all around departments of Near Eastern Languages and Cultures in the United States and is growing. As you navigate through this website, you'll note that our department has excellent degree programs in Middle Eastern Languages and Cultures (including Arabic and Islamics, Armenian, Hebrew and Jewish Studies, Iranian, Turkish) and Ancient Near Eastern Civilizations (including Assyriology and Sumerology, Biblical Studies, Egyptology, Near Eastern Archaeology). We offer a comprehensive body of undergraduate and graduate courses. Our students are committed to excellence in curricular and extracurricular activities. We have an outstanding faculty that is collectively dedicated to offering high quality graduate and undergraduate education, ground-breaking research and professional service.

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      • NELC Undergraduate Programs

        "The department offers the Bachelor of Arts degree in five fields: (1) Ancient Near East and Egyptology, (2) Arabic, (3) Iranian Studies, (4) Jewish Studies and (5) Middle Eastern Studies. In each of these fields students must meet the requisites and take the courses prescribed. Their adviser assists in selecting a plan of study developed around their interests. The Department of Near Eastern Languages and Cultures offers the following undergraduate minors: (1) Ancient Near East and Egyptology, (2) Arabic and Islamic Studies, (3) Armenian Studies, (4) Hebrew and Jewish Studies, (5) Israel Studies, (6) Iranian Studies and (7) Middle Eastern Studies. Students may combine their major with one in another department (double major) or add a minor to enhance their educational opportunities. Due to the number of additional courses required, they are advised to consider this option early in their academic career and in consultation with program advisers in both majors."

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      • NELC Graduate Programs [M.A. and Ph.D.]

        "The Department of Near Eastern Languages and Cultures offers a Master of Arts (M.A.) and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degrees in Islamic Studies or in Near Eastern Languages Cultures with sub-disciplines: (1) Ancient Near Eastern Civilizations, (2) Arabic, (3) Armenian, (4) Hebrew, (5) Iranian, (6), Semitics, and (7) Turkic. For each option, concentration may be on the linguistic, the literary, or, in the case of Ancient Near Eastern Civilizations, the archaeological aspect of the field."

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      • Department of Philosophy

        The UCLA Department of Philosophy has been among the top ranked doctoral programs for decades, with strengths across the discipline, including philosophy of language, philosophy of mind, metaphysics, philosophy of science, logic, philosophy of mathematics, ethics, social and political philosophy, philosophy of law, and the history of western philosophy, from antiquity to the present.

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      • Philosophy Undergraduate Program

        The word philosopher, translated from Greek, means lover of wisdom. The term has come to mean someone who seeks knowledge, enlightenment, and truth. The undergraduate program in philosophy is not directed at career objectives (although it is traditionally good preparation for law, theology, and graduate work in philosophy). Philosophy is taught to undergraduates primarily as a contribution to their liberal education. All of the lower and most of the upper division course offerings should be of interest and useful to students who are reflective about their beliefs or who wish to become so. It also provides the occasion to ponder the foundations of almost any other subject to which they are exposed -- whether history, religion, government, law, or science.

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      • Philosophy Graduate Program [joint JD/PhD]

        The principal goal of the graduate program is to produce philosophers of high quality, thinkers informed by the great historical traditions of Western philosophers who can apply the methods of philosophical analysis to a broad range of current philosophical problems. Since most of its graduate students hope to teach at the college or university level, the department is also committed to training clear, able, and stimulating teachers. UCLA offers a joint JD/PhD Program.

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      • The Scandinavian Section

        Since its inception in 1972, the Scandinavian Section has been one of the premiere programs in the country for the study of Nordic languages and literatures on the undergraduate and graduate levels. Along with a sister department at UC Berkeley, the Scandinavian Section provides members of the University of California community, and the citizens of California, with up-to-date, scholarly information and instruction on topics concerning the Nordic countries with a particular emphasis on their cultures, their histories and their languages.

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      • Scandinavian Languages and Cultures Undergraduate Program

        "The BA in Scandinavian Languages and Cultures seeks to train undergraduate students in the languages, literatures and cultures of the Nordic region (Denmark, Norway, Sweden, Finland and Iceland). The goal of the major in Scandinavian Languages and Cultures is to provide the student with a broad, yet robust, knowledge of the languages, literatures and cultures of the Nordic countries. Our course offerings span five centuries, five countries and five languages. The Scandinavian minor trains undergraduate students pursuing other degree objectives in the literatures and cultures of the Nordic region (Denmark, Norway, Sweden, Finland and Iceland). The goal of the minor in Scandinavian Languages and Literatures is to provide the student with a broad, yet robust, knowledge of the literature and cultures of the Nordic countries. Our course offerings span five centuries, five countries and five languages. The student graduating with a BA minor in Scandinavian languages will have a good command of the intellectual history of the region and a developing appreciation of the literatures and cultures of the countries that comprise this region. Students will be well suited to pursue advanced, graduate degrees in programs where an appreciation of the Nordic region would be an asset (international relations, public policy, planning, European history, study of indigenous populations in the arctic, film, design, history of science, medicine); seek governmental or non-governmental employment; or seek private sector work in areas that require expertise with the languages, cultures and histories of the Nordic region. Many students have used the minor in conjunction with engineering degrees, as the Nordic region is a leader in telecommunications, IT applications, engineering, naval design and engineering, aerospace, and pharmaceuticals."

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      • The Scandinavian Section Graduate Programs [M.A. and Ph.D.]

        Graduate Study in Scandinavian is intended to prepare students for careers in which an advanced knowledge of the history, culture and languages of Scandinavia are necessary. The PhD in Germanic Languages and Literatures with a Scandinavian emphasis is intended for students who would like to pursue a career in academia. The graduate programs are rigorous, in-depth endeavors that presuppose a significant background in Scandinavian languages and literatures. Students are mentored along the way, and individual goals are taken into consideration as the student progresses through the curriculum. The Scandinavian Section offers an M.A. (Master of Arts) degree in Scandinavian, and a Ph.D. in conjunction with the Ph.D. in Germanic Literatures and Languages. In the Ph.D. program, Scandinavian can be taken as either a major or minor field.

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      • Department of Slavic, East European & Eurasian Languages and Cultures

        Founded in 1948, the Department of Slavic, East European and Eurasian Languages and Cultures is one of the oldest and most prominent programs in its field in the United States. The program provides students with a comprehensive education in the languages, literatures, cultures, and history of Eastern and Central Europe and Eurasia. Students are encouraged to pursue their intellectual curiosity and develop analytical skills that will make them competitive in today’s job market. In a society that becomes progressively more diverse, the department encourages its students to become global citizens by giving them the opportunity to gain insight on one of the largest and most powerful regions in the world.

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      • SEEELC Undergraduate Program

        Undergraduate education is at the heart of the Department of Slavic, East European and Eurasian Languages and Cultures. The department boasts a vibrant and thriving undergraduate program that offers three majors and four minors all of which provide students with the opportunity to gain in-depth knowledge of Eastern Europe and Eurasia and valuable language skills. In addition to a variety of literature and culture courses, the department proudly offers courses in seven different languages (Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian, Czech, Hungarian, Polish, Romanian, Russian, Ukrainian) – five of which are taught on a regular basis – and encourages advanced study of these critical languages. Under the auspices of the department, students frequently study abroad and gain firsthand experience with the cultures and languages they are studying.

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      • SEEELC Graduate Programs [M.A. and Ph.D.]

        UCLA’s Department of Slavic, East European and Eurasian Languages and Cultures is known as an unusually rich program. As our new website shows, we are one of the exceptional departments still able to offer courses covering all periods of Slavic culture, from medieval to 21st century, as well as cutting-edge training in pedagogy and a range of East European languages and cultures. Cooperation with other world-class programs at the university offers the possibility of inter-disciplinary research in media, digital studies, theory, translation, history and religion.

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      • The UCLA Program in Experimental Critical Theory [SEEELC]

        The UCLA Program in Experimental Critical Theory is meant to galvanize, coordinate, and expand research and teaching in critical theory across departments and disciplines at UCLA. The Program offers the Graduate Certificate in Experimental Critical Theory, which is open to graduate students enrolled in a Ph.D. or MFA program in any participating department at UCLA. The Program also sponsors the annual ECT Colloquium, which meets twice a quarter, and various lectures and conferences.

        Website

      • Russian Flagship Program

        The UCLA Russian Flagship is designed to enable students to achieve professional-level competence in Russian at the undergraduate level. It is open to students in any major. Students in the Flagship program take courses in Russian language and area studies, with individualized study plans to complement their majors. They receive extra tutoring in Russian by native speakers. Scholarships are available to Flagship students for Russian language study, both in Russia and at UCLA.

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      • Department of Spanish & Portuguese

        "UCLA’s Department of Spanish and Portuguese is dedicated to research and teaching related to the languages, literatures, and cultures of the Spanish and Portuguese-speaking worlds. To this end, we offer a full range of undergraduate and graduate courses in five undergraduate majors, four minors, and the Ph.D. in Hispanic Languages and Literatures. Our mission is to educate the next generation of teachers, scholars, and citizens in our areas of specialization within the broader context of Los Angeles, the State of California, and the nation. The Department offers students a wealth of resources. Our seventeen tenured faculty members span the fields of Iberian and Latin American literature, culture, and linguistics, from the medieval period to contemporary literature and film. Students have excellent research facilities, access to UCLA’s vibrant multi-disciplinary intellectual community, plentiful talks, film screenings, and cultural events within the department and other campus units, as well as in off-campus theaters, libraries, and performance venues. Los Angeles is an important center for cultural production in the Spanish and Portuguese languages; every form of print media, film, TV, music, and theater from Latin America and the Iberian Peninsula is readily available. The strength of our program draws on the culture richness of the surrounding community, which is reflected in our faculty, our undergraduate and graduate students, our service learning programs, and our many cultural events."

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      • Spanish & Portuguese Undergraduate Program

        "Few universities in the world offer the extraordinary range and diversity of programs and courses that undergraduate students enjoy at UCLA. The Department of Spanish and Portuguese contributes to UCLA’s rich intellectual environment through the study and teaching of the languages, literatures, and cultures of Spanish- and Portuguese-speaking peoples in all areas of the world, particularly the Americas and Europe. The department offers majors in Spanish, Spanish and Community and Culture, Spanish and Portuguese, Portuguese, and Spanish and Linguistics, which are designed to give students a strong preparation in the languages, literatures, linguistics, and cultures of the Spanish and Portuguese speaking world. The department also offers minors in Portuguese, Spanish, Spanish Linguistics, and Mexican Studies."

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      • Spanish & Portuguese Graduate Program [Ph.D.]

        The Ph.D. program in Hispanic Languages and Literatures at UCLA offers an exciting and challenging education in research, writing, and teaching. The department supports a range of critical and theoretical approaches, and it encourages interdisciplinary work that takes advantage of UCLA’s many strengths across departments. Students take a broad distribution of courses in literature, linguistics, culture, film, and theory, followed by a rigorous specialization in their chosen field of study. Fields of study include Medieval and Early Modern Literature and Studies; Luso-Brazilian Literature and Studies; Latin American Literature and culture; Iberian Literature and Culture; Transatlantic Studies; and Spanish and Portuguese Linguistics.

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      • Language Program [Spanish & Portuguese]

        The Language Program offers beginning, intermediate, and advanced courses in Spanish and Portuguese language and culture. Our approach to language instruction is proficiency-oriented and our method is communicative and task-based. Students have the opportunity to develop communicative competence in all four skill areas (listening, speaking, reading and writing) as well as cultural competence.

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      • Study of Religion Undergraduate Program [Center for the Study of Religion]

        "The undergraduate major in the Study of Religion equips students to understand and compare creatively the worldwide varieties of core convictions, stories, texts, rituals, and practices known collectively as religion. Students complete courses in a wide range of departments in which religious phenomena are analyzed, including but not limited to: Anthropology, Art History, Asian Languages and Cultures, Classics, Comparative Literature, English, History, Near Eastern Languages and Cultures, Philosophy, Political Science, and World Arts and Cultures. Students can anticipate gaining versatile intellectual tools for approaching, analyzing, and appreciating the deep roots, human motivations, and history of the formation of religious traditions in their respective cultural contexts. Within this interdepartmental program, students may focus in depth on one or more specific religions. Students may wish to choose this major in combination with a second major field, a minor, or related language study. The Study of Religion minor is designed for students who wish to augment their selected major field in the College of Letters and Science with a group of courses dealing with the study of religion in various disciplines. The departments in which these courses are regularly offered include Anthropology, Art History, Asian Languages & Cultures, Classics, Comparative Literature, English, Ethnomusicology, History, Music History, Near Eastern Languages & Cultures, Philosophy, Political Science, Slavic Languages & Literatures, and World Arts & Cultures."

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      • Writing Programs

        UCLA Writing Programs

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  • Research
      • The UCLA Phonetics Lab [Linguistics]

        The UCLA Phonetics Laboratory was established by Peter Ladefoged in the English Department in Fall 1962 and moved with him to the new Linguistics Department in 1966. Members of the lab include faculty, postdocs, graduate students, staff, and visiting scholars in Linguistics. In our research we document sounds from a range of languages, and describe the behavior of a language's sounds as part of a linguistic system. The UCLA Linguistics Department is well-known for the close cooperation between its phonetics and phonology programs.

        Website

      • The Language Processing Lab [Linguistics]

        Welcome to the Language Processing Lab at UCLA! We are an interdisciplinary research space dedicated to exploring language and cognition through a multitude of methods. Current projects include behavioral judgments to written and auditory stimuli, eye movements, EEG recording, mouse tracking, and corpus work.

        Website

      • The Language Acquisition Lab [Linguistics]

        We are interested in studying how infants tune into their native language and how children eventually develop the ability to produce grammatical sentences. To do this we study infants', toddlers', and young children's speech perception and production abilities.

        Website

      • Psycholinguistics Laboratory [Linguistics]

        The Psycholinguistics/Neurolinguistics Lab is equipped for research and teaching in a variety of experimental and corpus-based techniques.

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  • Study Abroad
      • Asian Languages & Cultures Study Abroad

        ALC students often study abroad and use their credits toward their majors and/or minors. Study Abroad programs are offered in a variety of Asian countries including, China, Hong Kong, India, Japan, Korea, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam.

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      • Comparative Literature Study Abroad

        The Department of Comparative Literature participates in the system-wide Education Abroad Program offered by the University of California, providing long-term study (from one quarter to one year) at participating foreign universities. For more information, please consult the EAP website.

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      • English Study Abroad

        "UCLA Summer Travel Study Programs: - English in Florence: American Writers and Artists Abroad - Romanticism and the Age of the Revolution - Shakespeare in Stratford-upon-Avon and London"

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      • Summer Travel-Study Program in Paris [French and Francophone]

        The UCLA Department of French teaches its Travel-Study Program in Paris every July. The Paris program is designed for beginning, intermediate and advanced students of French, whose goal is speaking proficiency. Instruction is in French and draws upon the numerous cultural resources of Paris whenever possible. Highly motivated students anxious to discover this great world capital and acquaint themselves with its rich cultural heritage will benefit immensely from this opportunity to practice French beyond the confines of the classroom.

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      • UCLA German Summer Travel Study Program [Germanic Languages]

        "Take courses in German art, culture, and history (taught in English) as you move from Vienna to Munich and on to Berlin. You may also opt to take any level of German language. You will enjoy seeing three of the great cities both of contemporary Europe and of European history. The program is designed for students of all backgrounds and majors. We will learn through exploration: In Vienna we trace the footsteps of Gustav Klimt, Sigmund Freud, and others in the streets and coffee houses. In Munich we try to understand how a cultural capital of Europe could give rise to avant-garde art as well as the Nazi party. In Berlin, we will explore the dynamics of a city still healing from decades of war and division while also becoming the capital of the New Europe. In the new Berlin, arts and cultural scenes thrive and political decisions affecting the world economy are made. For language students there will be plenty of opportunities to practice your skills outside of the classroom!"

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      • Italian Study Abroad

        All Italian majors can apply to spend up to one year in Italy, either through the Education Abroad Program (EAP) or other approved US university programs. After being accepted, students consult with the Undergraduate Advisor on what courses to take abroad, and obtain UCLA transfer credit upon return. Students can also take advantage of UCLA's own summer language and culture program in Rimini.

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      • Travel Study in Rimini, Italy [Italian]

        UCLA offers an exciting annual summer-in-Italy program for undergraduate students from UCLA and other UC campuses. The program is staffed by one UCLA faculty member and two graduate students. In summer 2015 the program will be centered in Rimini on the Adriatic coast and directed by Dr. Elissa Tognozzi. For four weeks (late-June to late-July), students will study early modern, Renaissance and contemporary Italian culture (IT 42A) focusing on Rimini and the Emilia-Romagna region. Topics will range from art and literature to architecture and fashion. Students will also be enrolled in courses in either beginning or intermediate Italian taught by the Teaching Assistants. There will be two excursions, one to the early Christian center of Ravenna and the other to the Renaissance "ideal city" of Urbino. In Rimini, the entire group will share lodgings in a hotel near the train station. Classes will be conducted four days a week, Monday-Thursday, allowing for three-day weekends.

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      • Travel Grants for Graduate Students [LGBT Studies]

        The Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Program is pleased to be able to offer assistance with travel expenses to UCLA graduate students presenting LGBT-related work at conferences or pursuing LGBT research related activities. The purpose of this program is to support LGBT scholarship at UCLA and to make it possible for graduate students to make their research known to audiences beyond UCLA.

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      • Travel Study Programs [Spanish & Portuguese]

        The Department of Spanish and Portuguese also organizes annual faculty-led summer Travel Study Programs in Argentina (Buenos Aires), Brazil (Salvador da Bahia), Mexico (Merida), and Spain (Granada and Barcelona). Students may begin registering for these programs on November 15th of each year through the International Education Office.

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  • Initiatives/Events/Conferences
      • Experimental Critical Theory Program [Comparative Literature]

        "The UCLA Program in Experimental Critical Theory is meant to galvanize, coordinate, and expand research and teaching in critical theory across departments and disciplines at UCLA. The Program offers the Graduate Certificate in Experimental Critical Theory, which is open to graduate students enrolled in a Ph.D. or MFA program in any participating department at UCLA. The Program also sponsors the annual ECT Colloquium, which meets twice a quarter, and various lectures and conferences. Please visit the Events section of our own website to learn more about any upcoming series and talks in the ECT Program."

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      • Annual UCLA Comparative Literature Graduate Student Conference

        We are open to papers in all disciplines and treating material from all time periods. In addition to conventional panel presentations, we will offer performances and film screenings; interactive workshops on topics such as the history of psychiatry and an introduction to translation; and discussion sections on pre-circulated materials (primary and/or secondary).

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      • The Michael Henry Heim Memorial Lecture in Translation and Translation Studies [Comparative Literature]

        The Michael Henry Heim Memorial Lecture in Translation and Translation Studies is an annual lecture in memory of Michael Heim to continue his legacy. Professor Heim was a pioneer in translation studies, which is now an area of considerable significance to the field of comparative literature. He is remembered by his colleagues, students and friends as a world-class scholar, a model pedagogue and a devoted mentor, generous in his commitment to a communication and understanding across languages and cultures, giving pride of place to translation.

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      • UCLA Friends of English [English]

        "The UCLA Friends of English is a vibrant and energetic community whose members join together to support UCLA’s Department of English and to participate in the unique, enjoyable, and lively events afforded by membership. The Friends include the enthusiastic The Young Professionals Literary Society. The Young Professionals have their own distinct activities, and if they take advantage of the higher Young Professionals level, they also may participate in regular Friends' events. Through its significant contributions, the Friends of English assist UCLA’s Department of English in maintaining its status as one of the best in the United States. The Friends appreciate and are deeply grateful to our existing members. We hope that if you are not a member, you will consider joining our incredible family. You will be most welcome."

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      • 26th Annual Friends of English Southland Graduate Conference at UCLA [English]

        Organized by the graduate students of the UCLA English Department with generous sponsorship provided by the UCLA Friends of English

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      • Americanist Research Colloquium [English]

        The UCLA Americanist Research Colloquium (ARC) meets three to four times a quarter, providing American literature graduate students, faculty, and invited guests with an opportunity to share their works-in-progress. For more information, or to subscribe to our mailing list, please contact Professor Christopher Looby, clooby at humnet.ucla.edu

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      • Block Seminars [Program in Indo-European Studies]

        Once a year (usually during the Spring Quarter) the Program invites a Lecturer to hold a week-long intensive seminar on a topic that would not be normally offered on campus.

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      • UCLA Indo-European Conference [PIES]

        The Twenty-seventh Annual UCLA Indo-European Conference was held on Friday-Saturday October 23-24, 2015 on the campus of the University of California, Los Angeles in Royce Hall, Room 314. Invited speakers were Martin Kümmel of the Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena and Elizabeth Tucker of the University of Oxford.

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      • California Interdisciplinary Consortium of Italian Studies Conference [Italian]

        The California Interdisciplinary Consortium of Italian Studies (CICIS) was established in 2001 to bring together faculty, students, and independent scholars from around the state interested in Italy. CICIS' mission is to foster interdisciplinary and transnational research related to Italian studies in California, and to convene conferences where this research can be promoted, undertaken, presented, and discussed. The organization is open to UC faculty and graduate students as well as scholars and researchers from other California research institutions, and independent scholars residing in California. CICIS maintains a list-serve and holds meetings to discuss shared concerns and to organize annual conferences.

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      • Legal Theory Workshop [Law & Philosophy]

        The Legal Theory Workshop series, which is offered regularly throughout the year, brings prominent speakers from other universities. Students are encouraged to attend.

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      • Herbert Morris Lecture in Law and Philosophy

        "The Fourth Herbert Morris Lecture in Law and Philosophy will take place on Friday, February 20, 2015. The lecturer is Martha Nussbaum, the Ernst Freund Distinguished Service Professor of Law and Ethics, appointed in the Law School and Philosophy Department at the University of Chicago. The Lecture is in honor of UCLA's Professor Herbert Morris, an eminent emeritus member of both the Law School and the Philosophy Department, for his contributions to the field of legal philosophy and for his contributions to the campus as a professor, dean, and interim provost."

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      • Annual Queer Studies Conference [LGBT Studies]

        Every fall the LGBT Studies Program organizes a conference at which graduate students and faculty from around the country present research or other work, such as performance or film, in lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender studies, on queer topics, sexuality and gender. The conference was originally called "QGrad," and participation was limited to graduate students. Recently the conference has been expanded to include presentations by faculty scholars as well, but the focus still remains on graduate student work. Indeed, the inclusion of faculty presenters was motivated above all by the desire to make the conference more useful to grad students by fostering conversations and contacts between different scholarly generations.

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      • Division of Linguistic Labor:  the La Bretesche Workshop [Linguistics]

        In June 2003, a three-day workshop on 'Division of Linguistic Labor' in syntax, semantics and pragmatics took place at the Château de la Bretesche near Nantes, France. This workshop was made possible by a generous grant of the Borchard Foundation, whose goal was to foster scientific collaboration in linguistics between France and Southern California. The Foundation's goals were reached beyond anyone's expectations. The workshop initiated a long series of fruitful exchanges between UCLA, École Normale Supérieure, and Institut Jean-Nicod (CNRS), which took the form of numerous visits in both directions as well as the establishment of a formal exchange agreement. It also paved the way for a Fall School in Linguistics (EALing, 'École d'Automne en Linguistique'), organized at École Normale Supérieure in September 2003, 2004 and 2005. Last but not least, the workshop initiated new collaborations with European specialists who have in the meantime taught in the newly created Département d'Études Cognitives at École Normale Supérieure.

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      • UCLA Occasional Papers In Linguistics

        Our occasional papers are now available in free, downloadable PDF form. Unfortunately, we are no longer producing paper copies. However, we have a very limited supply of a few of our publications still in stock that we will continue to sell on a first-come, first-served basis.

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      • UCLA Working Papers in Linguistics

        Proceedings of the Twelfth Annual Conference of the Austronesian Formal Linguistics Association (AFLA)

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      • UCLA Working Papers in Phonetics [Linguistics]

        UCLA Working Papers in Phonetics (WPP) offers a preliminary report on work in progress in the UCLA Phonetics Lab. Through #102 in December 2002, it appeared as a print publication at irregular intervals at a frequency of one to three issues per year. Since Fall 2004, new issues of WPP have appeared in electronic form only.

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      • Linguistics Colloquium

        The UCLA Linguistics Department proudly sponsors a wide range of research talks. Our flagship series is the Linguistics Colloquium, which includes distinguished visiting speakers and is addressed to a general audience of linguists. Specialist talks cover a variety of areas, and are most often given by in-house speakers.

        Website

      • Ciro Zoppo Graduate Student Concerts [Musicology]

        The Ciro Zoppo Research Fellowship, generously funded by Ms. Rosemary Zoppo, encourages the study and performance of the works of lesser-known composers with a $3,000 prize for a graduate student in Musicology. Students share their research in the form of a performance/lecture recital.

        Website

      • Distinguished Lecture Series [Musicology]

        Each year, the graduate students in UCLA's Department of Musicology invite a number of outstanding scholars from this country and abroad to participate in the Distinguished Lectures Series. Sponsored by the Musicology Graduate Student Society, the UCLA Herb Alpert School of Music and the Department of Musicology, the content of lectures reflects the interests of visitors, faculty, and students, and has embraced diverse subjects pertaining to the study of music.

        Website

      • Robert Setevenson Lecture [Musicology]

        The Department of Musicology inaugurated its annual Robert Stevenson Lecture in 2002, with Professor Gary Tomlinson's lecture "Inca Singing at Cuzco, April 1535." This lecture series honors the career of UCLA Professor Emeriti Robert Stevenson, a leading scholar of Hispanic music.

        Website

      • Philosophy Club

        Our weekly meetings are held every Tuesday at 6 pm in Dodd 399 (the philosophy department's conference room). Discussion topics are chosen and presented by any club member, and we also host graduate students to speak on a piece of original work or area of interest. Club meetings often explore topics not commonly covered in undergraduate courses.

        Website

      • The First Undergraduate Philosophy Conference at UCLA

        The Philosophy Club at UCLA was proud to host its first mini-conference on behalf of Meditations: The Undergraduate Journal of Philosophy at UCLA. All participating authors and editors of the journal were undergraduate students who dedicated several months to this philosophical project. It was an exciting opportunity to honor their hard work and hear them present their original ideas. Additionally, it was a privilege to have Azusa Pacific University’s Joshua Rasmussen as our keynote speaker.

        Website

      • Philosophy of Language Workshop [Philosophy]

        The Philosophy of Language Workshop meets most quarters on Wednesdays at 3:00 PM in the Philosophy Common Room (Dodd 399). Officially this is a graduate course, but most attendees are not enrolled -- participants are mostly faculty and graduate students from graduate programs in Philosophy or Linguistics within driving distance of UCLA, and others who are visiting the area. All faculty and graduate students are welcome. Topics vary from quarter to quarter, and sometimes during the quarter. Sometimes a departmental colloquium speaker is enticed into leading a workshop discussion. The format is usually informal, with ample discussion. (Sometimes people try to present material in an organized fashion, and sometimes they are somewhat successful.) Topics vary from general to technical.

        Website

      • The Philosophy of Mathematics Workshop [Philosophy]

        The Philosophy of Mathematics Workshop traditionally meets most quarters on Mondays at 3:00 PM in the Philosophy Common Room (Dodd 399). It has not met during the 2006-07. Officially this is a graduate course, but most attendees are not enrolled -- participants are mostly faculty and graduate students from graduate programs in Philosophy or Linguistics within driving distance of UCLA, and others who are visiting the area. All faculty and graduate students are welcome. Topics vary from quarter to quarter, and sometimes during the quarter. Sometimes a departmental colloquium speaker is enticed into leading a workshop discussion, and sometimes speakers from elsewhere come and talk. The format is usually informal, with ample discussion. Topics vary from general to technical.

        Website

      • Ethics Writing Seminar [Philosophy]

        The Ethics Writing Seminar meets each quarter; students working in the areas of moral and political philosophy present and discuss current work.

        Website

      • Legal Theory Workshop [Philosophy]

        Legal Theory Workshop

        Website

      • The Albritton Society [Philosophy]

        The Albritton Society provides a forum where graduate students and young academics in the UCLA Philosophy Department may present work to their peers. Faculty may attend only by invitation from the speaker. Talks are held on Friday at 3:00 p.m. in Dodd 399, unless otherwise noted.

        Website

      • The USC/UCLA Joint Graduate Student Conference [Philosophy]

        The Annual USC-UCLA Graduate Student Conference began in 2006. Every year since its inception, students from other departments who have written high quality papers in contemporary philosophy have been invited to come give talks during a weekend in late winter.Visitors are encouraged to visit this site to see updated information on the current year's conference (CFP's, dates, programs, etc.).

        Website

      • Lecture and conference series [Philosophy]

        The Reichenbach Lectures; The Moody Conference in Medieval Philosophy; The Warren Quinn Lectures on Ethics; The Brigitte Rosenkranz Memorial Lectures; The UCLA Conference in History & Philosophy of Science

        Website

      • University of California Undergraduate Conference on Slavic and East/Central European Studies

        "The first University of California Undergraduate Conference on Slavic and East/Central European Studies took place in 1998. Since then, our annual event has drawn several hundred undergraduate scholars from across the UCs, USC, and other local universities and colleges. These students have presented papers on a wide variety of exciting topics concerning Russia, Eastern and Central Europe, the Caucasus, and Central Asia. Our conference promotes original research using the languages students study. It gives them an opportunity to integrate their language skills with focused investigations into the histories, politics, literatures, and cultures of the regions where those languages are spoken. It also allows students to meet peers from other colleges (or the same school) who have similar interests, fostering long-term friendships and professional connections."

        Website

      • Graduate Conference on Religion [Center for the Study of Religion]

        The UCLA Center for the Study of Religion announces its inaugural graduate student conference on religion. This graduate conference aims to bring together students from various academic disciplines in the arts and sciences who work on topics related to religion, including but not limited to: anthropology, area studies, art history, bioethics, cognitive studies, critical theory, film studies, gender studies, history, law, literature, neurology, philosophy, political science, psychology, sociology, queer studies, and world arts and cultures. We invite proposals from any academic, theoretical, or methodological approach.

        Website

  • Student Organizations
      • Sigma Tau Delta International English Honor Society [English]

        "Alpha Gamma Omega Chapter, University of California, Los Angeles Benefits of membership: - Academic recognition. - Writing opportunities and access to Sigma Tau Delta's creative and critical writing journals and online publications. - Chance to apply for scholarships, internships, writing awards, and more through the national organization. - Student leadership, community service, and event planning experience. - Chance to present research at the yearly Sigma Tau Delta annual convention. - A membership certificate and lapel pin. - Lifetime affiliation and fellowship."

        Website

      • English Graduate Union [English]

        The English Graduate Union (EGU) comprises and represents all English graduate students and operates as the collective voice of the English graduate body. Its officers, who are elected annually, work closely with the department's faculty and administration of the University to ensure that policy decisions reflect student concerns. The EGU holds general body meetings at least once a quarter and on an as-needed basis. The EGU officers may be reached via e-mail at EGU.

        Website

      • Cercle Francophone [French and Francophone]

        The Cercle Francophone meets regularly throughout the academic year. It offers a setting for informal interaction as well as providing a regular tutoring service for students seeking help on grammar and composition. Guest lecturers address topics of specific or general interest, and students organize activities such as lectures, film screenings, theatrical readings, job information sessions, business visits, and parties.

        Website

      • Italian Club

        The Department of Italian is also home to a thriving Italian Club, which is comprised mostly of undergraduate Italian enthusiasts and organized by Lecturer Hoang Troung. The weekly meetings aim to promote Italian language and culture through conversation, guest speakers, and cultural activities.

        Website

      • Philosophy Club

        Our weekly meetings are held every Tuesday at 6 pm in Dodd 399 (the philosophy department's conference room). Discussion topics are chosen and presented by any club member, and we also host graduate students to speak on a piece of original work or area of interest. Club meetings often explore topics not commonly covered in undergraduate courses.

        Website

  • Resources
      • Mind+Language UCLA [Philosophy]

        Mind+Language UCLA collects resources at UCLA relevant to philosophy of mind and language.

        Website

  • Grants/Fellowships/Scholarships
      • Mellon Program in Post-Classical Latin

        The UCLA Department of Classics is delighted to announce the award of a $700,000 grant by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to the Division of the Humanities to support the preparation and training of young scholars in post-classical Latin for graduate programs in Medieval and Renaissance Studies. Originally conceived and proposed by our former colleague, Professor Shane Butler (University of Bristol, Chair of Latin Language and Literature), the program has been funded for three years and will have a post-baccalaureate and graduate fellowship component.

        Website

      • Post-Baccalaureate Program in Post-Classical Latin [under Mellon Program]

        The post-baccalaureate program in post-classical Latin is intended for students who have completed B.A. degrees and who seek to pursue Ph.D. programs requiring study and proficiency in late Latin texts and documents. A cohort of up to four students will be chosen each year by a faculty subcommittee. All university fees and a stipend of $18,000 will be provided to allow the admitted students to spend a year at UCLA participating in the post-classical Latin curriculum as well as taking existing courses in Classical Latin and, more broadly, in undergraduate and graduate courses in Medieval and Renaissance Studies. Participating departments include English, History, Art History, Italian, Philosophy, French and Francophone Studies, and Near Eastern Languages and Cultures. The program offers a pro-seminar in the Fall Quarter to introduce students to UCLA faculty and to prepare them for successful applications to top-ranked Ph.D. programs.

        Website

      • Graduate Fellowship for Post-Classical Latin [under Mellon Program]

        The Mellon grant will provide up to two graduate fellowships each year to assist in the recruitment of students entering UCLA who intend to pursue Ph.D. programs in areas whose research involves the study of post-classical Latin texts. The department packages will provide six years of support by combining fellowships and teaching employment. The first year is provided by the Mellon grant, and includes the payment of all university fees and a stipend of $27,000.

        Website

      • Martin-Turrill Prizes [French and Francophone]

        The Martin-Turrill prizes, created to honor two alumnae sisters, are distributed each year to French Majors recognizing the best French essay and the best majors. Essays written from the Spring quarter of the preceding year may be submitted for the French Essay Prize by French Majors. At the end of each academic year, the Prize Committee will select one outstanding essay from among the essays submitted. The best majors are nominated by faculty members. Additional awards go to students going to EAP (under specific conditions) and the Paris Travel Study, and to students in charge of the Cercle Francophone.

        Website

      • Paris Summer Program Awards [French and Francophone]

        Provided by: The Carol Minuck Fund for French Education (two awards), and The Edgaro and Francesca Acosta Fund (one award). Three prizes ($1,000) will be awarded to Paris Summer Program participants based on financial need and excellence in French courses. Students must submit a letter explaining their commitment to French studies, a copy of their DPR, a copy of their Financial Aid Statement, and a letter of evaluation from a recent French instructor.

        Website

      • French Foundation of California Education Abroad Awards [French and Francophone]

        Up to three prizes ($1,000) will be awarded based on a competitive basis. Eligibility is based on the following criteria: 1) French majors participating in the education abroad program in France during the following academic year, 2) who were not born in France, 3) who have never visited France before, 4) who have completed two years of course work in French at UCLA.

        Website

      • Althea Caravacci Reynolds Undergraduate Research Award [Italian]

        The Department of Italian is delighted to offer an undergraduate research award in the amount of $2,500 to an Italian Major or Double Major. The award is offered annually by the family of the late Althea Caravacci Reynolds.

        Website

      • Giovanni Cecchetti Graduate Award [Italian]

        "Thanks to the generosity of Mrs. R. Elizabeth Cecchetti, the Department of Italian announces the Giovanni Cecchetti Graduate Award. An annual award of $3,000 will be awarded to one graduate student studying Italian literature. It may be used to fund dissertation research or any other research that the Department of Italian deems appropriate, and may be used in the United States or abroad."

        Website

      • Departmental Funding for Graduate Students [Italian]

        Occasional Fellowship Funds are awarded from the department to Graduate Students for a variety of financial reasons, including travel to conferences, limited summer fellowships and for partial fellowship and mentorship supplements.

        Website

      • Post Doctoral Fellowship in Law and Philosphy [Law & Philosophy]

        University of California Los Angeles School of Law and the UCLA Department of Philosophy are offering a one to two year research fellowship to a recent law school graduate or Ph.D. in philosophy (A second year of the fellowship is available assuming satisfactory performance in the first year.) The fellowship is under the auspices of the UCLA Program in Law and Philosophy. The fellow will be asked to teach two courses in the first year and one course in the second year of the fellowship, to attend and assist with the planning of Law and Philosophy events, to attend talks and conferences, and otherwise to participate actively in the law school and philosophy department communities. The bulk of his or her time will be devoted to independent research. Candidates should demonstrate a strong interest in a career involving teaching and research in law and philosophy.

        Website

      • Funding For Language Consultants And Experimental Subjects [Linguistics]

        Funding is approved by the Student Research Support Committee. AY 2015-2016 committee members are Prof. Nina Hyams and Prof. Harold Torrence. The Linguistics Department is remarkably generous in supporting student research as it contributes to a dissertation, thesis, and paper writing, as well as to students' general growth as linguists.

        Website

      • Ladefoged Scholarship Awards [Linguistics]

        Ladefoged Scholarship Awards are made from the fund established in memory of Peter Ladefoged. These awards go to graduate students in the Linguistics Department to offset the expenses of student research projects (other than for consultants or subjects, which are already covered by separate departmental funds). For example, awards can be used for expenses related to carrying out laboratory experiments or for linguistic fieldwork, such as transportation, development of stimuli, or recruitment, not available from other sources. Funding may also be requested for undergraduate research assistants when their role is essential to the project. For example, awards can be used to pay native speakers for help with stimulus preparation or coding. These awards are not intended to replace existing funding mechanisms inside or outside the department. The research supported must be the graduate student’s own research, with a preference for dissertation-related research; faculty research projects cannot be supported in this way.

        Website

      • Conference Travel funds [Linguistics]

        The department has budgeted funds to subsidize graduate student travel to major conferences for giving talks and presenting posters. This is money that, in principle, the department wants to spend, since giving conference talks is part of the professional training. It also might help you in a job search. Therefore, the department strongly encourages you to submit abstracts to major conferences in your field, as soon as your research program has developed to the appropriate point.

        Website

      • Ciro Zoppo Graduate Student Concerts [Musicology]

        The Ciro Zoppo Research Fellowship, generously funded by Ms. Rosemary Zoppo, encourages the study and performance of the works of lesser-known composers with a $3,000 prize for a graduate student in Musicology. Students share their research in the form of a performance/lecture recital.

        Website

      • Departmental Grants [NELC]

        Contact NELC Student Affairs Officer, Isamara Ramirez, directly for more information.

        Website

      • Rudolf and Ina Carnap Prize Essayists [Philosophy]

        Given annually in memory of Rudolf and Ina Carnap for excellent philosophical writing by a graduate student

        Website

      • Yost Prize [Philosophy]

        Given annually in honor of Robert M. Yost for excellent performance as a teaching assistant

        Website

      • Kalish Prize [Philosophy]

        In memory of Donald Kalish. Given annually for intellectual excellence, to be awarded by the faculty of the Philosophy Department to one or more of their most promising Undergraduate Students

        Website

      • Bragin Prize [Philosophy]

        Given in 2004 for the best undergraduate paper in the philosophy of science

        Website

      • Spring Essay Prizes [Spanish & Portuguese]

        The Department of Spanish and Portuguese’s annual Spring Essay Prizes in the amount of $250 are presented to undergraduate students with a declared major or minor in one of our programs. Prizes are awarded for the best academic papers written initially for an upper-division course taken in the previous Spring, Winter, or Fall quarters. Papers submitted for consideration should be between 8 and 15 pages in length and are due May 15th to the undergraduate advisor. The recipients are selected by a faculty committee and announced at the end of the Spring Quarter at a special end-of-year department reception.

        Website

  • Projects
      • The Philodemus Project [Classics]

        "The Philodemus Project is an international effort which aims, supported by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities and by the generous contributions of individuals and participating universities, to reconstruct new texts of Philodemus' works on Poetics, Rhetoric, and Music. These texts will be published, along with translations and notes, in a series of volumes by Oxford University Press. The Project's Directors are David Blank (UCLA), Richard Janko (University College, London) and Dirk Obbink (Christ Church, Oxford). Individual texts in the series are also being edited and translated by David Armstrong (University of Texas, Austin), Robert Gaines (University of Maryland, College Park), James Porter (University of California, Irvine), and Costantina Romeo (Sorrento). Other participants in the Project include Daniel Delattre (C.N.R.S.) and Michael Wigodsky (Stanford)."

        Website

  • Other
      • Nineteenth-Century Literature [English]

        "Nineteenth-Century Literature is a quarterly journal devoted to the study of all literary genres of the era. By virtue of the range and quality of its coverage, its longevity, and indeed its substantial subscription, NCL is justly regarded as the preeminent periodical in its field. NCL is recognized as a highly selective, meticulously edited journal that publishes significant studies of an eclectic range of nineteenth-century literary works. If oriented toward historically informed scholarship, NCL none the less encourages essays and reviews that reflect a broad spectrum of current critical approaches. Feminist, minority, post-structuralist, and new historicist inquiries take their place alongside more traditional perspectives on the relations between literary form and the nineteenth-century cultural context. Essays range from broad studies of literary movements to concise notes on specific points of critical contention or recent historical discoveries. Similarly, new interpretations of canonical works appear next to innovative analyses of neglected authors. Substantial reviews are regularly commissioned from scholars of distinction, ensuring that due attention is given to the best new research in the field. And further breadth of coverage can be found in the annotated list of ""Books Briefly Noted,"" which aims to include almost every volume that makes a scholarly contribution to knowledge. As a consequence, NCL is essential reading for those with a serious interest in the richly diversifying field of British and American nineteenth-century literature."

        Website

      • New German Review [Germanic Studies]

        "Since 1985 New German Review has provided a medium for graduate students, post-docs, and junior faculty to share original research with the academic community worldwide. New German Review is a peer-reviewed journal edited by graduate students in the Department of Germanic Languages at UCLA. Although the majority of our articles focus on German literature, we strive to publish an interdisciplinary journal dealing with the broader field of German Studies. We encourage authors to submit original work that encompasses topics concerned with any aspect of German language (either historical or applied linguistics), German intellectual history and philosophy, as well as German cultural studies (art, film, literature, and theater) from the Middle Ages to the present. Book reviews, interviews, and translations also make up an important component of the journal."

        Website

      • Indo-European Studies Volumes

        The Program is pleased to present a series of monographs and collections of papers in Indo-European studies by faculty and students of the UCLA Program in Indo-European Studies.

        Website

      • Carte Italiane [Italian]

        Started in the 1979-1980 academic year in the Department of Italian at UCLA, CARTE ITALIANE is dedicated to publishing the work of graduate students and international scholars in the field of Italian Cultural Studies. It is funded by the UCLA Graduate Students Association and by subscription fees.

        Website

      • NIAF Gift to Lorenzo Da Ponte Italian Library Series [Italian]

        UCLA’s Division of Humanities and the Department of Italian are delighted to announce a recent gift to the Lorenzo Da Ponte Italian Library series: a three-year grant from the esteemed National Italian American Foundation (NIAF), a nonprofit educational foundation dedicated to preserving Italian American culture and heritage. NIAF is the first sponsor outside of Italy and is now in the distinguished company of Fondazione Cassamarca of Treviso, Italy, the Italian Cultural Office of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the Italian Ministry of Arts and Culture.

        Website

      • UCLA Linguistics Blog

        Welcome to the blog page of the Linguistics Department at the University of California, Los Angeles.

        Website

      • Echo: A Music Centered Journal [Musicology]

        "Echo: A Music-Centered Journal is an interdisciplinary, peer-reviewed journal created and edited by graduate students in the Department of Musicology at the University of California, Los Angeles. Since our first issue in Fall 1999, we have published biannually and welcome submissions and project proposals throughout the year. Echo is an entirely Web-based journal, and can be accessed free of charge by any online visitor. Echo’s purpose is to create a forum for discussion about music and culture that includes voices from diverse backgrounds. To that end, we endeavor to make all work accessible to readers without formal musical training; the use of sound and film clips in our journal enables writers to discuss nuances of performance without relying solely on music notation. Articles address music in diverse social contexts, and are not confined to any geographically, historically, or methodologically bounded genre."

        Website

      • Meditations Philosophy Journal

        Meditations is the undergraduate journal of philosophy at UCLA. The purpose of the journal is to foster philosophical thought and provide an opportunity for undergraduates to gain writing and publishing experience. Maybe you have a philosophy paper that you're really proud of, or you're looking for a platform to test your arguments and be challenged. Maybe you have some cool ideas but hate writing when a grade depends on it. We encourage undergraduates of any major to participate in Meditations. Please see the electronic versions of our journal below.

        Website

      • Mester [Spanish & Portuguese]

        Mester is the academic journal published by the graduate students of the Department of Spanish and Portuguese, at the University of California, Los Angeles. Mester is dedicated to publishing academic work that reflects the highest level of scholarship such as critical articles, interviews, and book reviews in the fields of Spanish, Portuguese, Spanish American, Brazilian, and Chicano/a Literature, as well as Spanish and Portuguese linguistics.

        Website

      • Voices [Spanish & Portuguese]

        Voices consists of articles written on topics related to all aspects of the Spanish of the United States including linguistic contact, multilingualism, language and education, language politics and language maintenance, just to name a few. Intended as a way to publicize and disseminate the growing store of knowledge about the Spanish spoken in the US and related issues, this graduate student publication aims to bring more visibility to issues related to the Spanish of the United States and help to demonstrate that that Spanish spoken in this country is a legitimate linguistic variety and deserves further study.

        Website

  • Libraries
      • Linguistics Online Department Library

        Thanks to our many donors our department's library (also called the Reading Room, Campbell 2125) has a great abundance of books. To handle storage, we digitize most items (like dissertations) that are in Xexox-cum-binder format.

        Website

      • Cuneiform Digital Library Initiative [Near Eastern Languages and Cultures]

        A joint project of the University of California, Los Angeles, the University of Oxford, and the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science, Berlin

        Website

      • Reading Room [Philosophy]

        Reading Room: a unique research and study space to support faculty, students, and affiliated scholars.

        Website

      • The Strachwitz Frontera Collection of Mexican and Mexican American Recordings [Spanish & Portuguese]

        The Arhoolie Foundation’s Strachwitz Frontera Collection of commercially produced Mexican and Mexican-American recordings (the Frontera Collection) is the largest repository of Mexican and Mexican-American vernacular recordings in existence.

        Website

School of Public Health

Website

  • Centers/Institutes
      • Bixby Center on Population and Reproductive Health

        The Bixby Center on Population and Reproductive Health promotes and supports students and faculty engaged in research and internships in the areas of population, reproductive health, and family planning. The principal focus of the program is on reproductive health issues in developing countries, however, the Bixby Center also works on reproductive health-related issues in the United States.

        Website

      • Center for Cancer Prevention and Control Research (CPCR)

        The Center for Cancer Prevention and Control Research is a joint program of the School of Public Health and the Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center at UCLA. Since its inception in 1976, the Center has been nationally and internationally recognized for its pioneering work in cancer prevention and control research.

        Website

      • Center for Global Infectious Diseases

        Driven by its core public health mission, the Center for Global Infectious Diseases is a home for sustaining and expanding research evaluating how infectious diseases evolve and how their spread can be forecast and in turn mitigated or prevented. The Center will bring together an interdisciplinary group of faculty from across the campus, including those who study microbiology, virology, immunology, molecular genetics, ecology and the evolution of infectious diseases.

        Website

      • Center for Public Health and Disasters

        The Center for Public Health and Disasters was established in 1997 to address the critical issues faced when a disaster impacts a community. The center promotes interdisciplinary efforts to reduce the health impacts of domestic and international, natural and human-induced disasters

        Website

      • Global Media Center for Social Impact

        The Global Media Center for Social Impact increases awareness of important health issues and improves the well-being of people throughout the world by harnessing the storytelling power of television, film, music and new media.

        Website

      • UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health

        The UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health is comprised of faculty that have active research collaborations in more than 50 countries throughout the world, and several work both with immigrant communities in California and in the countries of origin of these communities. The Center offers a regular seminar series and a Certificate in Global Health available to students in any of UCLA's degree granting graduate and professional programs.

        Website

      • WORLD Policy Analysis Center

        The WORLD Policy Analysis Center is a non-profit policy research center that aims to improve the quantity and quality of globally comparative data on policies affecting human health, development, well-being, and equity by collecting and analyzing sources of information on rights, laws, and policies. With this data, WORLD informs policy debates, facilitates comparative studies of policy progress, feasibility, and effectiveness, and advances efforts to improve government transparency and accountability.

        Website

  • Programs/Degrees/Certificates/Specializations
      • Bixby Certificate

        The Bixby Program awards a Certificate on Population and Reproductive Health to graduating Masters students at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health who fulfill and achieve competency in population and reproductive health (PRH).

        Website

      • Global Health Certificate

        The Global Health Certificate will provide you with broad-based knowledge in global health, and can serve as a valuable qualification and differentiator in an increasingly competitive job market. Awarded through the UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health, the certificate is open to any graduate or professional student at UCLA. In conferring the certificate, the UCLA School of Public Health recognizes a student’s capacity to work as a public health or health care professional with a global health perspective.

        Website

  • Faculty